This page contains video content from various resources and is intended for general research as they are not specifically catagorised.

Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
05 May 2014 12:48 PM
Coastal adaptation: local action - video (4:30 seconds)
http://climatechange.gov.au/[…]/coastal-adaptation-local-action
“This resource is a video about the role of local councils and communities in responding to climate change. Using examples from several Australian states, the video describes how local government and authorities are responding to the challenges of climate change. It describes the areas of council operations that can be affected, and how tools provided by state and federal governments can be used to plan and implement adaptations. The video runs for approximately 4 minutes and 30 seconds…Topics: climate change, coastal settlement, sea levels, storm surges, risk management, environmental stewardship, environmental management, landforms, quality of life, environmental impact, community engagement, critical literacy”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
05 May 2014 12:49 PM
Coastal adaptation: infrastructure -video (5:30 seconds)
http://climatechange.gov.au/[…]/coastal-adaptation-infrastructure
“This resource is a video about the impact of climate change on infrastructure in the coastal areas of Australia. It describes the different types of risks to infrastructure, and the various types of infrastructure - industrial, communication, transport, waste and water services - that will be affected and impact on the lifestyle and livelihoods of most Australians. The video refers to an Australian Government report, Climate Change Risks to Australia’s Coast, and the need to develop a diversity of strategies for dealing with the threat. The video runs for approximately 5 minutes and 30 seconds… Topics: climate change, coastal settlement, coasts, sea levels, storm urges, risk management, environmental impacts, human settlement, consequences, sustainability”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
05 May 2014 12:54 PM
Sisters on the Planet – Sahena (Bangldesh) - Oxfam, video (6:58)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WqYgDGy8Z4M
Climate change is having a disproportional impact on people in developing countries. The annual monsoon rains in Bangladesh are becoming heavier and less predictable and affect millions of people. This video shows and tells the story of leadership and strategies used by one woman in one village.
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
05 May 2014 01:19 PM
Carbon 101

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cwazQpF91B0 (podcast, 10:38 minutes)
“Carbon 101 is a primer that includes descriptions of terminology and graphically explains how we now have too much of a good thing and why carbon dioxide and other heat trapping emissions from humans are rightly called carbon pollution. It is narrated in a video and podcast by Andrew Demetriou, CEO of the Australian Football League and Dr Graeme Pearman, former head of CSIRO Atmospheric Research, both of whom are Board Members of The Climate Institute”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
05 May 2014 02:17 PM
300 Years of FOSSIL FUELS in 300 Seconds –Post Carbon Institute, (5:39 minutes), 2010

http://www.youtube.com/watc[…]91SwP8w&feature=related

“Fossil fuels have powered human growth and ingenuity for centuries. Now that we're reaching the end of cheap and abundant oil and coal supplies, we're in for an exciting ride. While there's a real risk that we'll fall off a cliff, there's still time to control our transition to a post-carbon future” (lifted from site).
This video was awarded the winner of YouTube’s best non-profit video in 2011
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
05 May 2014 04:03 PM
Wake Up, Freak Out – then Get a Grip Leo Murray on Vimeo (11.34 minutes)

http://wakeupfreakout.org/film/tipping.html

“It turns out that the way we have been calculating the future impacts of climate change up to now has been missing a really important piece of the picture. It seems we are now dangerously close to the tipping point in the world's climate system; this is the point of no return, after which truly catastrophic changes become inevitable” (lifted from site).
This is a bleak, detailed animation. It may not be the most productive way to present this topic? I include it for your viewing. The transcript is also available.
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
19 May 2014 02:14 PM
Years of Living Dangerously Premiere Full Episode

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=brvhCnYvxQQ

It's the biggest story of our time. Hollywood's brightest stars and today's most respected journalists explore the issues of climate change and bring you intimate accounts of triumph and tragedy. YEARS OF LIVING DANGEROUSLY takes you directly to the heart of the matter in this awe-inspiring and cinematic documentary series event from Executive Producers James Cameron, Jerry Weintraub and Arnold Schwarzenegger.
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
02 June 2014 02:26 PM
James Hansen: Why I must speak out about climate change
                    
http://www.ted.com/talks/ja[…]t_about_climate_change.html

“Top climate scientist James Hansen tells the story of his involvement in the science of and debate over global climate change. In doing so he outlines the overwhelming evidence that change is happening and why that makes him deeply worried about the future. James Hansen has made key insights into our global climate - and inspired a generation of activists and scientists”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 11:31 AM
The Story of Cap and Trade
(9:56 minutes)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pA6FSy6EKrM

“The Story of Cap & Trade is a fast-paced, fact-filled look at the leading climate solution being discussed at Copenhagen and on Capitol Hill. Host Annie Leonard introduces the energy traders and Wall Street financiers at the heart of this scheme and reveals the "devils in the details" in current cap and trade proposals: free permits to big polluters, fake offsets and distraction from what’s really required to tackle the climate crisis’”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 11:32 AM
Carbon capture and storage – Lateline, Australian Broadcasting Corporation, (2:27 minutes)

http://www.abc.net.au/

“Is carbon capture and storage (CCS) the solution to climate change? CCS technology that captures carbon dioxide from the flue gases of coal burning power plants and takes it to long-term storage. The coal industry has high hopes that pumping the liquefied gas into underground reservoirs, or geo-sequestration, will provide safe storage. Find out what scientists from around the world think about CCS as a solution to global warming… Topics: atmosphere, carbon cycle, earth’s crust. Research and development, water cycle, carbon capture and storage”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 11:32 AM
Weather: Geoengineering: Solution or potential problem - Australian Broadcasting Corporation

http://www.abc.net.au/

“This clip from the ABC program 'Catalyst' (2010) investigates the controversial subject of geo-engineering, the concept of controlling and altering the Earth's weather patterns to combat climate change. Reporter Graham Phillips speaks to atmospheric physicist Professor Jo Haigh of Imperial College London about the pros, cons and potential environmental impacts of several possible climate control techniques… Topics: climate change, scientists, research and development”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 11:33 AM
Tiwi Carbon Study: managing fire for greenhouse gas abatement - CSIRO, video (9:22 seconds)

http://www.csiro.au/[…]/Tiwi-carbon-study.aspx

“This is a resource describing a study carried out by CSIRO and the people of the Tiwi Islands to research the effects of careful fire management on biodiversity, reducing greenhouse gas emissions, terrestrial carbon storage and potential earnings in carbon credit payments. The resource consists of an information sheet, a video and related links. Narrated by Tiwi park ranger Willy Riolli and including CSIRO scientists Alan Andersen, Anna Richards and John Schatz, it shows some of the unique and rare species of the Tiwi Islands, describes the aims of the study, illustrates the research techniques used, and identifies the findings to date”... Topics: atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, research and development, indigenous Australian people, forest fires, savannas, greenhouse gases, environmental stewardship, environmental management”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 11:33 AM
Using fodder to reduce parasites and pollution - Australian Broadcasting Corporation (1:31minutes)

http://splash.abc.net.au/me[…]uce-parasites-and-pollution

“Find out about a surprising approach that could help control cattle parasites and at the same time reduce cattle greenhouse gas emissions. Listen to Associate Professor Phil Vercoe and research fellow Zoe Dermitch explain the biological effects ('bioactive properties') that fodder plants could have on the cattle that graze on them”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 11:33 AM
Carbon control: Aboriginal fire-control knowledge and carbon trading – ABC, 2009, (2:22 minutes) http://abceducation.net.au/[…]/carbon-control-105

“In this clip from the ABC 'Catalyst' story 'Carbon country update' (2009), presenter Mark Horstman shows how Aboriginal fire-management practices are being used to prevent annual wildfires in Arnhem Land. The clip reveals that prescribed burning conducted around May, using local Aboriginal fire-control techniques, is being implemented to avoid the large-scale emissions of carbon dioxide into the atmosphere that result from fires that occur regularly during the much drier fire season of November. The clip features Aboriginal rangers as they go about setting firebreaks, and fire-management consultant Dr Jeremy Russell-Smith… Topics: controlled burns, environmental management, Aboriginal peoples, scientists, cultural diversity”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 11:34 AM
One man’s trash is another man’s treasure - Future Sparks

http://www.futuresparks.org.au/

“This resource is a webpage about Australian research into reducing methane emissions from cattle by using a waste by-product from vineyards in their feed. It contains a brief outline of the project and a link to a website that contains a text article, images, an audio file and a video and that describes the research in greater depth. The linked article discusses the interdependent environmental and productivity benefits of the research... Topics: atmosphere, biogeochemical cycles, research and development”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 12:18 PM
Common Ground – Kansas - LBNL, video (15:10 minutes)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ru4YDdBfXjw

“In 2010, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL) electricity-market, policy and consumer behavior expert Merrian Fuller singled out a small environmental organization in Kansas-- the Climate and Energy Project (CEP)- as an outstanding example of how you change behaviour on energy efficiency and reduce carbon emissions through an apolitical emphasis on heartland values”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 01:15 PM
Accelerating glaciers in Antarctica - Australian Broadcasting Corporation -(5:19 seconds)

http://splash.abc.net.au/media?id=30024

“Discover a white world in which glaciers are racing toward the sea at seven times their normal speed. This is what is happening in Antarctica now and the consequences will eventually be felt at your nearest beach. Travel with scientist Dr Paul Williams to see some stunning images of what is occurring around the fringes of the Antarctica continent and hear glaciologists explain why… Topics: atmosphere, scientists, theories, evaluation, Antarctica, glaciers, global warming”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 01:16 PM
Taking the ocean’s temperature - National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration – video (2:32)

http://oceantoday.noaa.gov/takingtheoceanstemp/welcome.html

“This is a video resource describing the Argo program, in which a fleet of underwater floats have been deployed at 3000 locations around the world to provide data on ocean temperature, pressure and salinity. It uses animation to illustrate how an Argo float operates to collect the different types of data at different depths and explains that scientists use these data to create ocean temperature maps, which have shown a warming trend over recent years. The video emphasises how important it is to keep track of how much and how quickly the ocean is warming, and concludes that the Argo floats make a significant contribution to this monitoring process. The video is captioned and a transcript is also included… Topics: climate, data collection, oceans, global warming, meteorological instruments, environmental management, water resources, global systems, sustainability”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 01:20 PM
Ask a Climate Scientist: Global Warming Pause? - Josh Willis, NASA , YouTube, (1:10 minutes)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MmoYStB-Rzw

A brief presentation regarding fluctuations but overall increased global warming.
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 01:21 PM
No Slowdown in Global Warming –Peter Sinclair: The Yale Forum on Climate Change, YouTube

(7:00 minutes)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=047vmL6Q_4g#t=421

Comprehensively refuting and explaining the ‘pause in global warming’ with reference to land and ocean metrics.
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 01:21 PM
No Slowdown in Global Warming –Peter Sinclair: The Yale Forum on Climate Change, YouTube

(7:00 minutes)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=047vmL6Q_4g#t=421

Comprehensively refuting and explaining the ‘pause in global warming’ with reference to land and ocean metrics.
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 01:45 PM
Critical Thinking on Climate Change: separating scepticism from denial - Dr Richard Milne, Edinburgh University, ( 1 hour: 20minutes)

http://www.skepticalscience[…]skepticism-from-denial.html

Dr Richard Milne from the University of Edinburgh explores the nature of science and genuine scientific scepticism using metaphors, cartoons, animations and jokes. He also debunks a number of climate myths.
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 01:57 PM
Plants and increased levels of carbon dioxide - Australian Broadcasting Corporation

http://splash.abc.net.au/me[…]ed-levels-of-carbon-dioxide

“We know that most plants use carbon dioxide to make their own food. So what might plants look like in 100 years if carbon dioxide levels continue to increase - will they become enormous and overtake our backyards? View the possible effects of changes in atmospheric carbon dioxide on plants and, in turn, humans and other animals... Topics: ecosystems, scientists, research and development, atmosphere, reasoning, photosynthesis”
Jesse Cook
Jesse Cook says:
06 November 2014 01:59 PM
Welcome to the Anthropocene: video (3:29 minutes)

http://www.planetunderpress[…]et/anthropocene_welcome.asp

This video is “designed to improve our collective understanding of the Earth system. The site aims to inspire, educate and engage people about humanity’s impact on Earth. Its unique combination of high-level scientific data and powerful imagery will help people visualize and better understand humanity’s geographic imprint in recent time”